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Hyundai Creta Diesel Manual First Drive Review

Few cars in India have managed to set themselves as a new brand. The Hyundai Creta did it with its original creation itself as it unprecedentedly ruled the roost of the mid-size SUV segment. And now there’s a brand new one. We also have driven the new turbo-petrol version and you can read about it over here.

In terms of look, the polarising styling of the new Creta certainly divides opinion. But look at it long enough and the design starts to grow . The divided headlamps and taillamps are Hyundai’s new global design language and so is your cascading grille. It is not as conventional-looking as the older Creta but manages to grab attention. Similarly, the 17-inch multi-spoke alloy wheels gel well with the car’s eccentric styling. Dimension smart, the new Creta is slightly longer, wider and stays lower than the outgoing model and this is evident in its position. All in all, the new Creta carries a global design and the appearance isn’t a deal-breaker in any way, as some might have begun to trust.

How’s the Interior of Hyundai Creta?

What catches attention the moment you sit inside is the quality and fit and finish of the utterly modern cabin. We enjoyed the somewhat wide 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment system dominating the center console and the new Audi A6-esque steering wheel design. Hyundai has done a good job of making the cottage feel upmarket with the usage of beige and black mix and aluminum inserts all around. Undoubtedly, the Creta’s cabin is a wonderful place to be in. However, we think, the use of soft-touch substances on the dashboard and door panels would have elevated the experience farther.

If we were to nit-pick, the simple-looking controls for the air-con and application of hard plastic round the cottage feel tacky. And should you want to stow away your knick-knacks, there is ample space for this all around. Speaking about the compact steering wheel, it feels nice to hold and the buttons onto it sense tactile too. Meanwhile, the electronic screen behind the steering wheel is flanked by analog needles on either side. This screen is large and easy to read. Yet, despite being a segment-first attribute, it isn’t well executed with its own animated interface and tawdry feel.

Creta Car Reviews
Creta Interior

As for the chairs, they’re comfortable and give ample under-thigh and lateral support. Both the front seats get chilled function and also the driver’s seat gets an electrical modification also. The visibility on offer is quite good as a result of this comparatively slim A-pillars and wide windscreen. The use of light-coloured materials additionally makes the cottage feel airy. Adding to this roomy feel is the huge panoramic sunroof. The back seat provides generous head and legroom having a comfortable seating position. They also get a correct recline and contours allowing the passenger to spend more hours at the backbench. On the flip side, there could have been more thigh support as well as also the shoulder area is a bit of a squeeze for three.

As for the boot area, it can easily gulp in a large-sized suitcase together with a couple of medium-sized suitcases leaving some room for backpacks and duffle bags. What is more, the cargo space is quite usable along with the loading lip is not too high either easing the attempt to put in heavy bag. Being a Hyundai, the new Creta also packs in a lengthy list of attributes. These features include automobile headlamps, powered mirrors, all-four disks, Bose audio system, smartphone connectivity, TPMS, ambient lighting, wireless charging, integrated air conditioner, and BlueLink connectivity to list a couple.

How does it drive?

What we have here is that the manual derivative with a power output of 113bhp accessible at 4000rpm and 250Nm accessible from 1500rpm (down from 128bhp/260Nm of the 1.6).

Upon turning up, the gas warms right into a elegant hum with very little vibrations sensed inside the cottage. Getting off the line, there is ample grunt from the instant you let go off the clutch. Additionally, unlike the older Creta — which had an inherent thoracic clutch action — the clutch is easy to operate. On the move, there is a small turbo lag round 1800-2000rpm but past this, the engine seems linear. There is a surge of electricity from 2000rpm once the turbo starts to spool up and it stays there till 4500rpm redline. But despite a fantastic degree of insulation, the engine noise starts filtering inside the cottage at this time. Nonetheless, it is not that tough clatter you’d expect from a petrol and is bearable.

If you keep it from the meaty mid-range, there is no need to always work throughout the gearbox, even if plodding through urban traffic. Even out on the highway, the relaxed nature of this engine permits the rev counter to sit around 2000rpm markers when doing highway speeds. And for quick overtakes, a solid mid does the trick as you only have to feather the throttle to begin. Cruising at triple-digit speeds does not strain the engine as well as the new Creta feels more stable and confident than the older version.

Although the clutch is smooth to operate, the exact same can’t be said about the gear-lever. It feels notchy when moving up and down the equipment. Now even though the steering has weight to it (contrary to what’s anticipated by Hyundai automobiles ) it’s prone to some lifeless off-centre feel. With approximately three turns heading lock-to-lock, it isn’t exactly straight and can be unwieldy when exhibited a pair of corners. Speaking of which, the body roll in the new Creta is under control but not completely absent. Nevertheless, the ride at slow town speeds is on a firmer side. Not that it’s jarring or uneasy, but you might feel flatter street bumps inside the cottage. On the other hand, as the rate rises, the Creta takes astride little irregularities and undulations with ease. Talking about brakes, they offer loyal biting force bringing the 1360kg SUV to slow down/halt at any given rates with confidence.

Should I buy Creta 2020?

Now, using a new performance variant from the turbo-petrol guise available, the diesel-powered Creta would be an option for people looking for an elegant and frugal SUV that is additionally hassle-free to own. Obviously combined with this, the new-gen Creta also appreciates aspects like a spacious and upmarket cabin, a long list of features (many of which can be segment-first), and Hyundai’s tried and tested aftersales service. Although its styling may split opinion and the fact that the Creta is not a driver’s car, it will not stop car buyers from appreciating that new Creta is still a well-packaged family SUV.

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Hyundai Verna Car Design, Performance Reviews

Hyundai has spruced up contest from the C-segment using the comprehensively updated Verna. This is not a generation update from the 2019 ICOTY version, but the Korean carmaker has revamped it with an all-new layout language, newer powertrain and first-in-class capabilities. Part of this update is the brand new 1.0-litre turbocharged three-cylinder gas motor which we are driving here.

Upfront, the broad and cascading grille is finished in gloss black and black receives a exceptional pattern unlike the typical mesh layout. Making the upgrade look more comprehensive are those wraparound headlamps that also get newer LED lighting elements.

The 16-inch dual-tone alloys gel nicely with the styling. Even though the shape of the tail lamps is kept, it does get a newer light signature. Our favorite part of the styling is the rear bumper with a gloss black diffuser, incorporated dual-barrel exhaust, and those scaled patterns on each side. All in all, the brand new Verna looks stylish and upmarket with its Korean’ styling-adopted-for-European marketplace’ design.

How’s the Interior of Hyundai Verna?

Step inside and you will find apparent changes to the cottage that make it feel just like a new car. Firstly, there is the all-digital instrument cluster which has an uncanny resemblance to BMW’s digital layout. Many might not concur with this fake, but it does seem expensive and upmarket. It’s also easy to read, and better than the Creta’s part-digital screen.

Hyundai verna
Hyundai Verna

This being a Turbo trim, you get an all-black cottage with red accents on the redesigned air vents and upholstery sewing. On the reverse side, the dashboard proceeds to acquire hard plastics and Hyundai could have supplied some soft touch points to make the cottage feel somewhat more premium.

Like the older Verna, there’s ample space on the interior. Both front seats become cooled function and offer good lateral support and strengthening. Nonetheless, it lacks under-thigh support, especially for taller driver/passenger. Moving into the rear, the seats are pretty comfortable and nicely angled. They’re not hard to get in, however the narrow and low door makes ingress a tight fit (unless you are in good shape), especially for the elderly.

Here, the under-thigh support is below average. Meanwhile, the sufficiently big boot can swallow up big suitcases and a few medium-sizedones readily with ample room to spare.

Concerning attributes, Hyundai has also introduced its BlueLink connected characteristics in the new Verna.

How’s the Hyundai Verna Engine?

With the update, Hyundai has rejigged the entire power train line-up of the Verna. Together with the brand new 1.5-liter petrol and petrol, it now gets a 998cc Kappa Turbo GDi three-cylinder turbo-petrol producing 118bhp at 6000rpm and a twisting force of 172Nm available at 1500rpm. Sending this ability to the front wheels is a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic. And it’s the sole cut to get paddle-shifters.

Once launched, the engine settles into a refined hum, with little to no vibrations of this normal three-cylinder motor felt inside the cabin. You would barely hear it off-the-line too and the engine feels excited once you shift to D and then let go of the brakes. Since the torque is accessible so low down the rev range, the sedan has going smoothly and readily even with the smallest dab the accelerator pedal. It’s past 2000rpm when the engine comes alive and it remains like that until the 6500rpm redline.

Beneath full-bore acceleration, you get a surge in the momentum, which may not push you in the chairs, but it does feel like it’s holding your hands to hurl you along softly. Of course, triple-digit speed arrives quickly, even before the DCT can work through all its seven gears. But you have to hear this three-cylinder din under hard acceleration.

When driving at town rates, since all of the torque is available low down in round the 1500rpm markers, the engine feels relaxed, and there’s no need to kick start the engine should you need to go quicker or plan some quick overtakes. The inherent qualities of this three-cylinder make it quite usable and easy to drive also. Out on the street, the DCT keeps the revs around 2000rpm while leisurely cruising at triple-digit rates. It also maintains the correct gear almost every time — whether you would like to cruise along or do some quick dashes between the visitors — without letting you realise that the gearshifts. You could also slot the lever into S and take control of shifts manually. The conveniently-placed paddle-shifters supporting the steering does supply the liberty of shifting along with your fingertips too. We noticed the electronically-controlled DCT tends to up shift itself closer to redline, regardless whether you are in D or S mode.

In terms of the steering, it is light to operate and can also be guide, with less than two-and-half turns lock-to-lock. Surprisingly, it is not obscure off the middle either and weighs up nicely as the speed increases, which is reassuring when you want to be enthusiastic behind the wheel. Hyundai appears to have functioned the suspension for the Turbo trim, as the ride quality is currently well sorted. The automobile never scraped even once over a speed-breaker, which is commendable too. At low speeds, it has a firm composition for it, but it is far from being uncomfortable.

Additionally, it feels tight and there is less body roll — if not completely absent because it is still tuned for comfort. And as the speed increases, the suspensions figure out how to absorb undulation and irregularities with aplomb, even better edges are well cared for and you don’t hear the suspension functioning inside the cabin. With great high-speed equilibrium and a spirited engine, it’s not difficult to push the car nearer to its limits, but we expected a bit more initial bite and not as spongy feel from the brakes to get more confidence while pushing the limits.

Conclusion:

Hyundai is offering the Verna Turbo at a single, fully-loaded trimming with an ex-showroom label of Rs 14 lakh. For the cost, you receive a handsome-looking sedan using a standout styling, feature-loaded interior and a new engine that will make you yearn for your driver’s seat more often than you’d imagine. The new Verna has great drivability too with its elegant engine, sorted suspensions, butter-smooth gearbox plus balanced steering. So if you enjoy driving yet need a comfortable family car, there is not much that orders against buying the Verna Turbo.

The Verna is currently the newest car in the C-segment before the new-gen Honda City arrives. But it isn’t the only one in the section with a turbo-petrol engine. There’s the Volkswagen Vento TSI on sale, and also the Skoda Rapid TSI is on its way.

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2020 Tata Harrier Automatic and Manual First Drive Review

Believe Tata Harrier, and the first thing that comes to your mind is that a true-blue SUV with astounding road presence. More so in its own sexy all-black apparel termed’Black-Edition’ which only flaunts its stunning curves. Come 2020, and the Tata Harrier is not only BS6 compliant with approximately 30bhp more, it also boasts of an automatic version with more gear. However, before we dig deeper, let’s get the appearances from the way.

This bit then flows on to a rather rugged profile; finish with a cladded lower segment with severe clearance through those new diamond cut alloys.

It doesn’t end there. A blacked-out roof can be seen easily blending the roof into the tail portion with the signature’arrow’ tail lamps that game snazzy LED internals. These slender tail lamps are quite the visual treat as they flow easily on to ends thanks to some foxy glossy-black trim.

How’s the Tata Harrier Interior?

So, the eye-catching design layout continues. Undoubtedly, the Harrier’s cottage is a nice spot to maintain. There’s a nice flowing design, from the doorway pads on to the layered dash.

Tata has done a good job by giving a premium feel by minding a few oak-wood coloured trim all across together with the oak-wood trimming and fitting oak-brown leather upholstery. However, the party piece needs to be the trendy floating-island base that retains the touchscreen infotainment system, air-con vents and switches to the car’s functions.

Harrier Car Review
Harrier Car Review

In terms of stowage, there is enough space in the cubby spaces before this lever, the cup-holders and centre armrest behind it, and more in the deep doorway pads and glove-box. Now overall, although grade rates have improved over the previous car, we nevertheless find it a color below section competitions like the Jeep Compass.

But what’s nice about the Harrier is the fact that it is a spacious SUV. There’s ample legroom, shoulder-room and headroom both in front and rear. Even the chairs at the ends are big and comfortable, with a great deal of support making them good for extended journeys.

However, we believed that the raked window-line does decrease visibility to the rear occupants. In terms of the 425-litre boot, there is enough space for three medium-sized suitcases and some soft bags. And if that’s not enough, simply reverse the 60:40 bench over to unveil up to a total of 810-litres, enough for most requirements.

You also get Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility with the audio system which boasts of two JBL speakers and an amplifier. And finally, safety is cared for by the ESP (all variants), six airbags, hill descent control, electronic traction and stability control, hill hold, corner equilibrium control, off road ABS and the back parking sensors using a camera, to name a few.

How Does the Engine Perform?

With the updated BS6 Kryotec 2.0-litre turbocharged diesel, output has risen from 140bhp into 168bhp, but the torque stays identical at 350Nm. Likewise, the new Harrier also receives a six-speed automatic variant to follow with its six-speed manual transmission variant. Upon cranking this engine, those familiar with the older Harrier will immediately appreciate the overall fall in NVH.

Keen on knowing how this automatic felt to drive, I slotted the shifter to’D’ and released the brakes. The Harrier crept ahead progressively, after which, as I implemented some throttle, it nudged ahead smoothly and purposefully. I immediately appreciated this six-speed automated torque convertor unit did a good job of setting the controller input to extend a linear power delivery.

And, as soon as one strikes 1500rpm, there’s a noticeable spike in reaction, post which it pulls cleanly to the 4600rpm redline. In fact, this engine just gets vocal if you keep the pedal pinned to the ground beyond 3500rpm. As for the shifts, they’re actioned seamlessly, and really facilitates driving this automatic all-day-long without breaking a sweat.

And since we are talking convenience, there’s no need for continuous braking or slotting into a lower gear when going downhill since it retains a favorable power to prevent freewheeling (coasting). What’s more, we admired the stress-free temperament of the motor once we glanced in the rev-clock to view it operating under 2000rpm at over 100kmph. Moving forward, slotting into Tiptronic mode (guide ) automatically summons the’Sport’ mode to give you quick responses.

All you have to do today is feather the controller for the Harrier to ride the torque curve, and cover ground like an aerial battle vehicle. And, in the event that you ever miss upshifting yourself, the system will automatically upshift for you at roughly 3600rpm to save the gearbox. But having said that,’City’ mode is much more than what you are ever going to want, as it provides enough response for many driving conditions. And, for those who are low on fuel or so are anal about fuel efficiency,’ Eco’ using its relaxed response, does the occupation; 14.63kmpl to be exact.

Let us discuss the manual version now. Together with the 30-odd extra horses, there’s no need for downshifting to get greater performance from this motor. You just need to hover around the 1500rpm mark to ensure a simple tap on the accelerator pedal will get you access to the meaty section of the power group; like for a quick overtake. So much so, that we never felt the need for more out of this engine.

Additionally, even when you are not driving in the best rev-range, it will not bog down or something. The flexibility of this powertrain permits you to lug along in the exact same gear. Which brings us into a welcome change.

Now, even though the NVH is much better contained than before, we might feel some buzz creep throughout the pedals and gear shifter once the engine revved beyond 3400rpm or so. As is true for the automatic, the manual also receives the drive manners which lend the same behavior we discussed previously. And, when the going gets rough, the ESP terrain modes like’Normal” Rough’ and’Wet’ come handy also.

As for the steering, the two-and-a-half turns from the lock-to-lock result in a good response in many driving situations. Moreover, being mild with great progression around the middle makes maneuvering the Harrier that little simpler.

We have to admit this monocoque with Land Rover underpinnings gives it clean handling manners with minimal roll. Concerning ride, the powerful suspension setup feels indestructible even once you plow through our road hurdles. Sure, the ride is taut at lower rates, but since you venture into three-digit types, the Harrier only decimates everything our Indian roads throw at it.

Conclusion:

In the absence of an automatic edition, Tata Motors was simply unable to tap into the Harrier’s complete potential. But that’s going to change, and undoubtedly for the better due to the ease of forcing provided from the automatic. All for only an extra Rs 1.5 lakhs over its guide stable-mate.

Let us just say you are still in doubt. Now, the Harrier was known for its broad and comfortable nature, a striking road existence, and for being packed reasonably well. What makes the 2020 Tata Harrier compelling over the earlier one, is the excess power and resultant revised dynamics, the addition of new attributes, convincing revisions, and the mouth-watering new red paint shade to stand out of any audience.

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Honda City 2020 Design, Features Reviews

With an all-new design, upgraded platform and reworked mechanicals, this really is actually the fifth-generation Honda City, due for launch in July. Currently, the City has a strong brand remember in India, and in nature, it’s the product that formed Honda’s fortunes in the country. So much so, that it has continued its dominance in the midsize sedan section since its debut, and even manages to take the fight to the likes of the Hyundai Creta and the Kia Seltos. And also to appeal to a broad array of buyers, the All New City will be sold along with the current-generation version.

The 2020 Honda City features an evolutionary design and brings cues in the Honda Civic. The tapering nose, flowing the coupe-ish tail brings out the sporty styling of the sedan. What adds personality to the fascia is the large chrome pub on the grille and the exquisitely-designed full-LED headlamps. The profile is highlighted by the sloping roof and the dual-tone 16-inch alloys, while the wraparound LED taillights with a Z-shaped light touch adds a fantastic touch to the rear.

How can it be about inside?

On the inside, you are welcomed to a well-thought-out cabin with dual-tone colors that help elevate the premium experience. The clean dashboard layout is complemented by the classier-looking faux wood trim along with the leather end. And compared to this earlier touchpad controls of the ACC device, we particularly enjoy the physical climate control switches, which enhances functionality. There are enough cubby holes and the large door pockets readily gobble a one-liter jar. While the plastic quality is on par with the competition, some tough plastics lower-below might have been of better quality

honda city reviews
Honda City Interior

Front seats offer generous side boosting, which enhances driving comfort. And the large glasshouse and narrow A-pillar offer an unrestricted view of the environment. However, the highpoint is the rear seat that offers acres of distance, which may put cars from a segment-above to pity. The chair provides liberal under-thigh support, along with the backrest angle, flat floor and wide seat make it a decent five-seater. On the flip side, the 506-litres of boot space, coupled with a very low loading lip makes it sensible for a weekend trip or the usual airport runs.

The All-New City features an eight-inch infotainment system replete with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. It also gets the next-gen Honda Connect connected automobile tech that allows you to remotely control 32 characteristics of the car, including SOS alerts, real time entry, find my vehicle, book a service and a whole lot more.

How’s it like to Drive& Engine Performance?

The New City can be obtained with three engine/gearbox mixes. There is a 1.5-liter gas unit using manual and automatic (CVT) transmissions and a 1.5-liter diesel with a manual. We’re driving the 1.5-liter gasoline version, which is coupled to a six-speed manual. This is a totally reworked engine using a DOHC setup, also benefits from VTC (Variable Valve Timing Control). The iVTEC engine offers two camera profiles the lesser one for superior efficiency and combustion, and also the high camera for performance.

The free-revving engine seems refined and is barely audible at idle, but as the revs rise past 4,000rpm, it starts sounding raspy. There’s adequate torque available lower down the revs, so even with small throttle inputs, the engine responds quickly to keep up with the traffic. And, should you wish to make swift progress, there is dollops of torque available in the mid century past the 2,500rpm mark. With this, a gentle dab on the throttle is sufficient to overtake the vehicles ahead, while it also makes keeping triple-digit speeds on the highways, simple. What’s more, if you’re in for some spirited driving, there’s a fantastic surge of electricity throughout the broad power band, before it starts tapering down around 6,500rpm.

The gearbox provides short throws along with well-defined gates, which essentially does not necessitate much attempt to work through the gears. But, it felt somewhat notchy to function. Otherwise, the elastic gearing permits you to run a higher equipment at lower rates; for example, we were able to drive in third gear between 20-30kmph, without having to downshift. On the flip side, in case you need to create a quick overtake, you would have to downshift to whizz past traffic. Nevertheless, the tall nature of the higher gears means that you can maintain cruising speeds at low rpms, which should translate to greater fuel economy.

Coming to the ride piece, the suspension rounds off bumps nicely and provides sufficient cushion over sharper edges. And as you build rate, the suspension cleans out undulations and maintains composure superbly. It is only when you suddenly encounter a tough patch at high speeds, when the ride unsettles slightly. Honda appears to have found a good balance between relaxation and sporty. It’s a good heft at city-speeds and weighs up adequately as the rate increases. And although it isn’t vague at the centre, we’d have expected more feedback. On the contrary, the wheels lack first bite but offer very good progression and stopping power. But you get a wooden or weathered texture in the pedal.

Should I buy Honda City 2020?

The All-New City is a persuasive package in the midsize sedan section that offers a sporty design, is filled with features, and features a comfortable and spacious cabin. The new City must appeal to the family man as well as the enthusiast in you, with its neutral street manners and the engaging drive encounter. And, in addition to the Honda connected car tech, it also receives a comprehensive security kit that includes six airbags, vehicle stability assist, tyre pressure monitoring system, hill start assist and much more. What’s more, it also comes with a five-star safety score in ASEAN NCAP. If anything, then we would’ve appreciated a better infotainment system and quality plastics in the lower parts. However, these are not a deal-breaker for what the All-New City provides.