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Hyundai Creta Diesel Manual First Drive Review

Few cars in India have managed to set themselves as a new brand. The Hyundai Creta did it with its original creation itself as it unprecedentedly ruled the roost of the mid-size SUV segment. And now there’s a brand new one. We also have driven the new turbo-petrol version and you can read about it over here.

In terms of look, the polarising styling of the new Creta certainly divides opinion. But look at it long enough and the design starts to grow . The divided headlamps and taillamps are Hyundai’s new global design language and so is your cascading grille. It is not as conventional-looking as the older Creta but manages to grab attention. Similarly, the 17-inch multi-spoke alloy wheels gel well with the car’s eccentric styling. Dimension smart, the new Creta is slightly longer, wider and stays lower than the outgoing model and this is evident in its position. All in all, the new Creta carries a global design and the appearance isn’t a deal-breaker in any way, as some might have begun to trust.

How’s the Interior of Hyundai Creta?

What catches attention the moment you sit inside is the quality and fit and finish of the utterly modern cabin. We enjoyed the somewhat wide 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment system dominating the center console and the new Audi A6-esque steering wheel design. Hyundai has done a good job of making the cottage feel upmarket with the usage of beige and black mix and aluminum inserts all around. Undoubtedly, the Creta’s cabin is a wonderful place to be in. However, we think, the use of soft-touch substances on the dashboard and door panels would have elevated the experience farther.

If we were to nit-pick, the simple-looking controls for the air-con and application of hard plastic round the cottage feel tacky. And should you want to stow away your knick-knacks, there is ample space for this all around. Speaking about the compact steering wheel, it feels nice to hold and the buttons onto it sense tactile too. Meanwhile, the electronic screen behind the steering wheel is flanked by analog needles on either side. This screen is large and easy to read. Yet, despite being a segment-first attribute, it isn’t well executed with its own animated interface and tawdry feel.

Creta Car Reviews
Creta Interior

As for the chairs, they’re comfortable and give ample under-thigh and lateral support. Both the front seats get chilled function and also the driver’s seat gets an electrical modification also. The visibility on offer is quite good as a result of this comparatively slim A-pillars and wide windscreen. The use of light-coloured materials additionally makes the cottage feel airy. Adding to this roomy feel is the huge panoramic sunroof. The back seat provides generous head and legroom having a comfortable seating position. They also get a correct recline and contours allowing the passenger to spend more hours at the backbench. On the flip side, there could have been more thigh support as well as also the shoulder area is a bit of a squeeze for three.

As for the boot area, it can easily gulp in a large-sized suitcase together with a couple of medium-sized suitcases leaving some room for backpacks and duffle bags. What is more, the cargo space is quite usable along with the loading lip is not too high either easing the attempt to put in heavy bag. Being a Hyundai, the new Creta also packs in a lengthy list of attributes. These features include automobile headlamps, powered mirrors, all-four disks, Bose audio system, smartphone connectivity, TPMS, ambient lighting, wireless charging, integrated air conditioner, and BlueLink connectivity to list a couple.

How does it drive?

What we have here is that the manual derivative with a power output of 113bhp accessible at 4000rpm and 250Nm accessible from 1500rpm (down from 128bhp/260Nm of the 1.6).

Upon turning up, the gas warms right into a elegant hum with very little vibrations sensed inside the cottage. Getting off the line, there is ample grunt from the instant you let go off the clutch. Additionally, unlike the older Creta — which had an inherent thoracic clutch action — the clutch is easy to operate. On the move, there is a small turbo lag round 1800-2000rpm but past this, the engine seems linear. There is a surge of electricity from 2000rpm once the turbo starts to spool up and it stays there till 4500rpm redline. But despite a fantastic degree of insulation, the engine noise starts filtering inside the cottage at this time. Nonetheless, it is not that tough clatter you’d expect from a petrol and is bearable.

If you keep it from the meaty mid-range, there is no need to always work throughout the gearbox, even if plodding through urban traffic. Even out on the highway, the relaxed nature of this engine permits the rev counter to sit around 2000rpm markers when doing highway speeds. And for quick overtakes, a solid mid does the trick as you only have to feather the throttle to begin. Cruising at triple-digit speeds does not strain the engine as well as the new Creta feels more stable and confident than the older version.

Although the clutch is smooth to operate, the exact same can’t be said about the gear-lever. It feels notchy when moving up and down the equipment. Now even though the steering has weight to it (contrary to what’s anticipated by Hyundai automobiles ) it’s prone to some lifeless off-centre feel. With approximately three turns heading lock-to-lock, it isn’t exactly straight and can be unwieldy when exhibited a pair of corners. Speaking of which, the body roll in the new Creta is under control but not completely absent. Nevertheless, the ride at slow town speeds is on a firmer side. Not that it’s jarring or uneasy, but you might feel flatter street bumps inside the cottage. On the other hand, as the rate rises, the Creta takes astride little irregularities and undulations with ease. Talking about brakes, they offer loyal biting force bringing the 1360kg SUV to slow down/halt at any given rates with confidence.

Should I buy Creta 2020?

Now, using a new performance variant from the turbo-petrol guise available, the diesel-powered Creta would be an option for people looking for an elegant and frugal SUV that is additionally hassle-free to own. Obviously combined with this, the new-gen Creta also appreciates aspects like a spacious and upmarket cabin, a long list of features (many of which can be segment-first), and Hyundai’s tried and tested aftersales service. Although its styling may split opinion and the fact that the Creta is not a driver’s car, it will not stop car buyers from appreciating that new Creta is still a well-packaged family SUV.

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