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Hyundai Verna Car Design, Performance Reviews

Hyundai has spruced up contest from the C-segment using the comprehensively updated Verna. This is not a generation update from the 2019 ICOTY version, but the Korean carmaker has revamped it with an all-new layout language, newer powertrain and first-in-class capabilities. Part of this update is the brand new 1.0-litre turbocharged three-cylinder gas motor which we are driving here.

Upfront, the broad and cascading grille is finished in gloss black and black receives a exceptional pattern unlike the typical mesh layout. Making the upgrade look more comprehensive are those wraparound headlamps that also get newer LED lighting elements.

The 16-inch dual-tone alloys gel nicely with the styling. Even though the shape of the tail lamps is kept, it does get a newer light signature. Our favorite part of the styling is the rear bumper with a gloss black diffuser, incorporated dual-barrel exhaust, and those scaled patterns on each side. All in all, the brand new Verna looks stylish and upmarket with its Korean’ styling-adopted-for-European marketplace’ design.

How’s the Interior of Hyundai Verna?

Step inside and you will find apparent changes to the cottage that make it feel just like a new car. Firstly, there is the all-digital instrument cluster which has an uncanny resemblance to BMW’s digital layout. Many might not concur with this fake, but it does seem expensive and upmarket. It’s also easy to read, and better than the Creta’s part-digital screen.

Hyundai verna
Hyundai Verna

This being a Turbo trim, you get an all-black cottage with red accents on the redesigned air vents and upholstery sewing. On the reverse side, the dashboard proceeds to acquire hard plastics and Hyundai could have supplied some soft touch points to make the cottage feel somewhat more premium.

Like the older Verna, there’s ample space on the interior. Both front seats become cooled function and offer good lateral support and strengthening. Nonetheless, it lacks under-thigh support, especially for taller driver/passenger. Moving into the rear, the seats are pretty comfortable and nicely angled. They’re not hard to get in, however the narrow and low door makes ingress a tight fit (unless you are in good shape), especially for the elderly.

Here, the under-thigh support is below average. Meanwhile, the sufficiently big boot can swallow up big suitcases and a few medium-sizedones readily with ample room to spare.

Concerning attributes, Hyundai has also introduced its BlueLink connected characteristics in the new Verna.

How’s the Hyundai Verna Engine?

With the update, Hyundai has rejigged the entire power train line-up of the Verna. Together with the brand new 1.5-liter petrol and petrol, it now gets a 998cc Kappa Turbo GDi three-cylinder turbo-petrol producing 118bhp at 6000rpm and a twisting force of 172Nm available at 1500rpm. Sending this ability to the front wheels is a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic. And it’s the sole cut to get paddle-shifters.

Once launched, the engine settles into a refined hum, with little to no vibrations of this normal three-cylinder motor felt inside the cabin. You would barely hear it off-the-line too and the engine feels excited once you shift to D and then let go of the brakes. Since the torque is accessible so low down the rev range, the sedan has going smoothly and readily even with the smallest dab the accelerator pedal. It’s past 2000rpm when the engine comes alive and it remains like that until the 6500rpm redline.

Beneath full-bore acceleration, you get a surge in the momentum, which may not push you in the chairs, but it does feel like it’s holding your hands to hurl you along softly. Of course, triple-digit speed arrives quickly, even before the DCT can work through all its seven gears. But you have to hear this three-cylinder din under hard acceleration.

When driving at town rates, since all of the torque is available low down in round the 1500rpm markers, the engine feels relaxed, and there’s no need to kick start the engine should you need to go quicker or plan some quick overtakes. The inherent qualities of this three-cylinder make it quite usable and easy to drive also. Out on the street, the DCT keeps the revs around 2000rpm while leisurely cruising at triple-digit rates. It also maintains the correct gear almost every time — whether you would like to cruise along or do some quick dashes between the visitors — without letting you realise that the gearshifts. You could also slot the lever into S and take control of shifts manually. The conveniently-placed paddle-shifters supporting the steering does supply the liberty of shifting along with your fingertips too. We noticed the electronically-controlled DCT tends to up shift itself closer to redline, regardless whether you are in D or S mode.

In terms of the steering, it is light to operate and can also be guide, with less than two-and-half turns lock-to-lock. Surprisingly, it is not obscure off the middle either and weighs up nicely as the speed increases, which is reassuring when you want to be enthusiastic behind the wheel. Hyundai appears to have functioned the suspension for the Turbo trim, as the ride quality is currently well sorted. The automobile never scraped even once over a speed-breaker, which is commendable too. At low speeds, it has a firm composition for it, but it is far from being uncomfortable.

Additionally, it feels tight and there is less body roll — if not completely absent because it is still tuned for comfort. And as the speed increases, the suspensions figure out how to absorb undulation and irregularities with aplomb, even better edges are well cared for and you don’t hear the suspension functioning inside the cabin. With great high-speed equilibrium and a spirited engine, it’s not difficult to push the car nearer to its limits, but we expected a bit more initial bite and not as spongy feel from the brakes to get more confidence while pushing the limits.

Conclusion:

Hyundai is offering the Verna Turbo at a single, fully-loaded trimming with an ex-showroom label of Rs 14 lakh. For the cost, you receive a handsome-looking sedan using a standout styling, feature-loaded interior and a new engine that will make you yearn for your driver’s seat more often than you’d imagine. The new Verna has great drivability too with its elegant engine, sorted suspensions, butter-smooth gearbox plus balanced steering. So if you enjoy driving yet need a comfortable family car, there is not much that orders against buying the Verna Turbo.

The Verna is currently the newest car in the C-segment before the new-gen Honda City arrives. But it isn’t the only one in the section with a turbo-petrol engine. There’s the Volkswagen Vento TSI on sale, and also the Skoda Rapid TSI is on its way.

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